Fraud Alert Center


Be alert to the latest scams.


Debit Card Fraud Alert: Please be vigilant about phishing attempts designed to appear like fraud alerts intended to protect you. Scams will try to obtain your card number and other sensitive information to “reactivate” a frozen or locked card.
 
Please remember Capital City Bank will never text, call or e-mail and require you to provide your full 16-digit card number, PIN or CVV (security code), or your online banking password. This information is never needed for any reason - not to verify your identify nor to service your account or debit card.
 
If you have received a request like this or any other that concerns you, please contact us right away at the number on the back of your debit card.
 
Read more below about recognizing and averting debit card phishing and other common scams.

 

Be alert to counterfeit fraud alerts.

These scams look to take advantage of the trust you have in your financial institution and the measures they put in place to protect you.

Spot it:

Phishing attempts designed to appear like fraud alerts intended to protect you will try to obtain your card number and other sensitive information to “reactivate” a frozen or locked card. They create urgency by playing on our fear of being stranded without a working debit card.

Avoid it:

Scammers are well scripted, organized and convincing, but even the most sophisticated schemes give themselves away if you know what to look for.

Capital City Bank will never call, text or e-mail and ask clients to confirm any of the following information under any circumstance, be it for identification or to assist with any debit card or account servicing issue:
  • Full debit card number – we would only ever identify a card by the last four digits
  • Debit card PIN
  • Debit card CVV
  • Online banking password
It's also important to keep in mind, scammers have technology now to spoof the name and phone number of any business, so even if the call or text appears to come from Capital City Bank (shows Capital City Bank and/or our phone number in the message or caller id/sender information), the best course of action is to hang up without providing any information and call us at the number on the back of their debit card.

If you have received a request like this or any other that concerns you, please contact us right away at the number on the back of your debit card.



































Be alert to technical support scams.

Scammers may ask you to click a link or download software to allow them to resolve an issue, provide "technical assistance" or better service. 

Even if a caller claims to be from a business you know, be suspicious and contact your banker immediately if they are requesting access to your device for technical assistance. 

Spot it:

These scams usually begin with a call, text or e-mail claiming a problem with your account or debit card to get your attention. They either provide a phone number to call or ask you for a response that will trigger someone to call you (e.g. a text message asking you to confirm a recent purchase. When you reply that you did not make the purchase, they call.) At some point during the call, they say they need access to your device to resolve the issue, and they send a link to click to allow them in. The link may appear to launch some action on your device but this is all part of the deception. Their goal is obtaining your online banking credentials so they can access to your account and steal funds.

Avoid it:

Scammers are well scripted, organized and convincing, but even the most sophisticated schemes give themselves away if you know what to look for.

There are certain things a legitimate business will never do, no matter the circumstances. Do not trust anyone asking you to:

  • Share your password. NO ONE needs your password except you -- not even your financial institution.
  • Provide personal information, including Social Security numbers and bank account details, after contacting you unexpectedly. Be wary whether the request comes via call, text or e-mail or is a live person or automated system.  
  • Click a link in an e-mail or text message in order to enable them to provide technical assistance or better service.

A caution about caller id, links and unverified contact information:

Scammers have spoofing technology that allows them to make any call or text message appear to come from any number, so even if the caller id or sender information looks familiar, do not click links appearing e-mail or text messages, or call phone numbers provided in unexpected calls, texts or e-mails. 

The best course of action is to call us at the number on the back of your debit card or published on our official website. In the event the outreach was legitimate, you can be confident you'll receive the help you need when contacting us that way. 

View our Business Impersonation tab for details about one common type of support app/takeover scam.




































Be alert to support app scams.

Scams involving technical support and business impersonation are on the rise.

Even if a caller claims to be from a business you know, be suspicious and contact your banker immediately if they are requesting access to your device for technical assistance or asking you to enter your refund amount into a pop-up window on your screen. 

Spot it:

Impersonation fraud is a scheme where an imposter who identifies themselves as representing a familiar business - or even the government - and asks you to send money. One common claim is you have received too large a refund and must return the overpaid amount. Their goal is to trick you into sending money, giving them access to your bank accounts or even allowing them to use you as a money mule to move funds.

Avoid it:

Scammers are well scripted, organized and convincing, but even the most sophisticated schemes give themselves away if you know what to look for.

There are certain things a legitimate business will never do, no matter the circumstances. Do not trust anyone asking you to:

  • Share your password. NO ONE needs your password except you.
  • Pay back an overpayment in the form of a wire, cash, bitcoin, cash app or gift card, or send a picture of the numbers on the back of a gift card. 
  • Deposit a check on another person's behalf, whom they claim is unable to get to the bank to make the deposit themselves. This is commonly known as a money-mule scam, and the checks you are receiving are from others who have been scammed.
  • Make a payment to an individual.
  • Use overpayment funds to purchase cell phones, tablets or computers and mail them to an individual.
  • Agree to accept overpayment for an item you are selling and send back the difference before their check clears.
  • Allow remote access to your device in order to receive a refund.
  • Mail cash wrapped in tin foil (or cover the cash by some other method) so mail scanners cannot pick up the presence of cash.
  • Make quick money by starting a business or working from home.

A caution about links and unverified contact information:
Remember scammers use links in e-mails and text messages to misdirect you to fraudulent sites where they can steal financial information and account credentials. Do not click links appearing e-mail or text messages, or call phone numbers provided in unexpected calls, texts or e-mails. Always go to a company’s website directly when looking for contact information, and do not trust contact information you find in web search results.

 

Explore the key components of the business impersonation scam below.

What you should know:
  • The most commonly impersonated businesses are Amazon followed by Apple, according to the Federal Trade Commission, but the caller could be using the name of any familiar business – even a government agency.
  • Contact can be attempted via phone, text or e-mail.
  • Contact is usually not initiated by you.
  • The name or number on your caller ID might look legitimate because advanced spoofing capability now used widely by scammers allows them to disguise actual caller information.

Scam-Savvy Tips:

  • Legitimate organizations won’t call, text or e-mail to ask for your personal information, including Social Security numbers and bank account details.
  • Stop unwanted calls and texts from reaching you by blocking them on your phone.
  • If you have reason to believe an e-mail or text from a company you do business with is real, it’s always best to verify the sender before clicking any links. But look up their contact information on their website and do not trust phone numbers provided in the message or on your caller ID. Today, these are easily spoofed by scammers.
The "hooks":
  • We owe you a refund.
  • You owe.
  • You’ve won and we need to get you your prize.
    Links to “claim a free prize” commonly lead to a page where you’re asked to provide payment information to cover shipping costs. The only “prize” you’ll receive is unauthorized activity on your card or account.
  • There’s a problem, e.g. an error on your account, a virus on your computer, you are in trouble with the government, there’s been an emergency.
    You can easily confirm suspicions by contacting the company or agency directly instead of following the instructions given on the call or e-mail. Remember to obtain contact information from a verified source, e.g. the company's website or the back of your debit or credit card. Do not trust contact information left in e-mails, voicemails or text messages.
Scam-Savvy Tips:
IF THEY'RE ASKING YOU TO... WHAT THEY'RE REALLY DOING IS...

Allow remote access to your computer by clicking a link or responding to a pop-up window.


Using spoofed websites and other tactics such as keystroke loggers to steal debit or credit card information or account login credentials.

Send money back after receiving an overpaid refund.

Having already gained access to your account, they have transferred your own money from another account or line of credit to trick you into believing the activity you are seeing is the fake refund.

Purchase gift cards and tell them the card numbers or send them a picture of the back of the card.

Using the numbers to steal the funds you've loaded onto the gift card while telling you that sharing what they are calling “blocking codes” or “security codes” prevents anyone else from accessing the money on the card. 

What you should know: Urgency is a ploy used by scammers because they want you to act before you have time to think about whether their requests make sense.

Scam-Savvy Tip: Where a legitimate business will allow you time to make a decision, a scammer succeeds by using fear or threats to induce you to act immediately.

































Be alert to scams after the storm.

While our communities focus on recovering from the storm, scammers may be taking aim at those looking to rebuild - and those looking to help. 


CHARITABLE GIVING SCAMS

Looking to capitalize on the generosity of those desiring to help those most affected, scammers may solicit donations, sometimes for a charity that does not exist, but sometimes, using the name of a known and reputable entity, like the American Red Cross, with which they claim to be affiliated. Scammers may approach you by phone, text, mail, e-mail or even going door to door.

Avoid it:

  • If you want to give, the best rule of thumb is to do so through an established, reputable and recognizable organization. If you are approached by someone claiming to be collecting on behalf of a charity you recognize, ask for proof that they are an employee or volunteer.
  • If you are getting pressure to give immediately, you are likely dealing with a scammer - a legitimate charity will welcome your contribution at the time you choose to give.
  • The FTC recommends searching for the charity's name plus "complaints" or "scams."
  • Be wary if you received a thank you for a previous donation you don't remember making that asks for additional support.

 

CONSTRUCTION & REPAIR SCAMS

In the wake of a disaster like a hurricane, fraudsters flock to damaged communities offering contractor, construction or repair services and claim to need an up-front fee to purchase supplies. Once they've received the fee, they disappear without completing the work.

Spot it:

Be on the lookout for red flags that include:

  • unsolicited approach
  • claims to be an out-of-state contractor
  • cannot produce references
  • lacks the usual indicators of a professional business (e.g. uniform shirt, business card, vehicle signage)
Avoid it:
In addition to being wary of an individual or entity that raises any of the red flags above:
  • Before making any payments, verify licenses at www.myfloridalicense.com.
  • Photograph the individual's driver's license or work vehicle, if it has identifying information.
  • Ensure you have a clearly written contract - may be as short as one or two-paragraphs, but clearly states that any deposit will be used to purchase supplies, the work will be completed in a defined amount of time, etc.
  • Avoid paying deposits in cash. Use a credit card, check or payment service like Zelle so you have a record of payment.
  • Don't make a final payment until all the work is completed to your satisfaction.

 

HOMEOWNERS INSURANCE SCAMS

Criminals posing as construction companies that partner with insurance companies may try to obtain policy numbers, coverage details or personal information. They may also attempt to persuade homeowners to sign an Assignment of Benefits (AOB) in exchange for immediate repairs. An AOB transfers rights of benefits to the named party and gives that entity the authority to file a claim, make repair decisions and collect insurance payments without the involvement of the homeowner. Given this authority, the scammer may claim funds above the actual cost of the work. 


OTHER SCAMS
  • Fake Fake Government Assistance - A fraudster pretends to be from a governmental agency and requests an advanced fee or personal information, which they will use to apply for legitimate government benefits to be sent to themselves or open credit card accounts.
    Avoid it: Officials with government disaster assistance agencies such as FEMA or the Small Business Administration (SBA) will never contact  you requesting personal or financial account information, and there is never a fee for the disaster assistance they provide. Ask to see identification and report anyone making this claim to StopFEMAFraud@fema.dhs.gov , 866-223-0814, or https://www.usa.gov/state-consumer/florida.
  • Housing - Involves a fake listing for a home or apartment rental, a landlord who claims to be overseas or otherwise unable to meet in person or communicate except for via e-mail, and requires you to wire money to "hold the unit" before a lease is signed or you have seen the property.
    Avoid it: Always ensure you see the property for rent before making any payments.
  • Job Scams - Preying on out-of-work people, scammers advertises jobs that sound too good to be true (e.g. work from home, mystery shopper, reshipping, "payment processor" who either open bank accounts or use their own to forward payments overseas).
    Avoid it: Do not respond to unsolicited offers of employment. Ensure a company is established and reputable. Never cash or deposit a check and use the proceeds to send money back to the originator or buy gift cards.

Compiled from information sourced from the International Association of Financial Crimes Investigation, Sarasota County Sherriff's Office Federal Trade Commission and USA Today